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Malted Barley Grains (Milled)

Malted Barley is an exceptionally rich source of microbes, with a wide range of bacteria, filamentous fungi and yeasts colonizing the area between the husk and the pericarp. Many of the bacteria and fungi found on barley grains produce biologically significant levels of indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), a vital plant growth hormone that promotes cell division and is involved in the coordination and development of plant organs.

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Malted Barley Grains (Milled)

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Bioavailability

When used in your garden, malted barley grain functions as a source of growth hormone catalysts, providing enzymes and plant hormone producing microbes to supercharge your garden. The enzymes below are found in malted barley grains. They break down the nutrients that your plants need and make them able to be absorbed.

Amylase, an enzyme found chiefly in saliva and pancreatic fluid, that converts starch and glycogen into simple sugars.

Arylsulfatase, (or cerebroside-sulfatase) is an enzyme that breaks down sulfatides, namely cerebroside 3-sulfate into cerebroside and sulfate.

β-glucosidase, is an enzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of the glyosidic bonds to terminal non-reducing residues in beta-D-glucosides and oligosaccharides, with release of glucose.

Glucose is a simple sugar with the molecular formula C6H12O6. Glucose is the most abundant monosaccharide, a subcategory of carbohydrates. Glucose is mainly made by plants and most algae during photosynthesis from water and carbon dioxide, using energy from sunlight.

Cellulase, is a class of enzymes produced by the fungi bacteria and protozoans that generate cellulolysis. This process is actually the hydrolysis of cellulose.

Chitinase, As chitin is a component of the cell walls of fungi and exoskeletal elements of some animals (including worms and arthropods), chitinases are generally found in organisms that either need to reshape their own chitin or dissolve and digest the chitin of fungi or animals.

Dehydrogenase, an enzyme that catalyzes the removal of hydrogen atoms from a particular molecule, particularly in the electron transport chain reactions of cell respiration in conjunction with the coenzymes NAD and FAD.

Phosphatase, an enzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of organic phosphates in a specified (acid or alkaline) environment.

Protease, is an enzyme that catalyzes proteolysis, the breakdown of proteins into smaller polypeptides or single amino acids. They do this by cleaving the peptide bonds within proteins by hydrolysis, a reaction where water breaks bonds.

Urease, a naturally occurring enzyme that hydrolyzes urea into ammonium carbonate

What are malted barley grains?

Malted barley is made when raw barley is naturally processed (malted) using only water, heat and time. Because the raw barley is minimally processed, it is considered “natural”. There are three steps of the malting process:

1) Steeping— Raw barley is alternately submerged and drained for 40-48 hours in steep tanks until a moisture level of 40% or greater is achieved. This activates the embryo to initiate enzyme development and growth of the rootlets. This is the beginning of germination.

2) Germination— Steeped grain is then moved to a germination compartment where germination continues for four to seven days at controlled temperature, humidity and oxygen levels. During germination the barley is modified. Modification refers to the breakdown of complex proteins and carbohydrates which opens up the starch reserves. Enzymes in germinating barley include high levels of alpha amylase, and lower levels of beta amylase and proteases.

3) Drying (kilning)—Drying on a kiln or roaster halts germination. Gentle kiln drying preserves enzymes and develops malty flavors. Higher temperature drying in a kiln and/or roaster results in more unique flavor development and decreases or completely denatures enzymes.

How do I use malted barley grains?

1. Top dress plants with 1/8 - 1/4 Cup per plant. 

2. Build your soil using this milled meal at 1/2 - 1 Cup Per Cubic Foot. 

3. Bubble a tea for 4 hours in water then use immediately using 1/8th cup per gallon water. 

Why should I use malted barley grains?

When used in your garden malted barley Grain functions as a source of growth hormone catalysts, providing enzymes and plant hormone producing microbes to feed the soil and supercharge your garden.

Application

1 cup ≈ 5 oz.

  1. Top dress plants with 1/8 - 1/4 cup per plant.
  2. Build your soil using this seed meal at 1/2 - 1 cup per cubic foot.
  3. Bubble a tea for 4 hours in water then use immediately using 1/8th cup per gallon water.

Malted Barley Grains (Milled)

Malted Barley Grains (Milled)

Malted Barley is an exceptionally rich source of microbes, with a wide range of bacteria, filamentous fungi and yeasts colonizing the area between the husk and the pericarp. Many of the bacteria and fungi found on barley grains produce biologically significant levels of indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), a vital plant growth hormone that promotes cell division and is involved in the coordination and development of plant organs.

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Bioavailability

When used in your garden, malted barley grain functions as a source of growth hormone catalysts, providing enzymes and plant hormone producing microbes to supercharge your garden. The enzymes below are found in malted barley grains. They break down the nutrients that your plants need and make them able to be absorbed.

Amylase, an enzyme found chiefly in saliva and pancreatic fluid, that converts starch and glycogen into simple sugars.

Arylsulfatase, (or cerebroside-sulfatase) is an enzyme that breaks down sulfatides, namely cerebroside 3-sulfate into cerebroside and sulfate.

β-glucosidase, is an enzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of the glyosidic bonds to terminal non-reducing residues in beta-D-glucosides and oligosaccharides, with release of glucose.

Glucose is a simple sugar with the molecular formula C6H12O6. Glucose is the most abundant monosaccharide, a subcategory of carbohydrates. Glucose is mainly made by plants and most algae during photosynthesis from water and carbon dioxide, using energy from sunlight.

Cellulase, is a class of enzymes produced by the fungi bacteria and protozoans that generate cellulolysis. This process is actually the hydrolysis of cellulose.

Chitinase, As chitin is a component of the cell walls of fungi and exoskeletal elements of some animals (including worms and arthropods), chitinases are generally found in organisms that either need to reshape their own chitin or dissolve and digest the chitin of fungi or animals.

Dehydrogenase, an enzyme that catalyzes the removal of hydrogen atoms from a particular molecule, particularly in the electron transport chain reactions of cell respiration in conjunction with the coenzymes NAD and FAD.

Phosphatase, an enzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of organic phosphates in a specified (acid or alkaline) environment.

Protease, is an enzyme that catalyzes proteolysis, the breakdown of proteins into smaller polypeptides or single amino acids. They do this by cleaving the peptide bonds within proteins by hydrolysis, a reaction where water breaks bonds.

Urease, a naturally occurring enzyme that hydrolyzes urea into ammonium carbonate

Common Questions

What are malted barley grains?

Malted barley is made when raw barley is naturally processed (malted) using only water, heat and time. Because the raw barley is minimally processed, it is considered “natural”. There are three steps of the malting process:

1) Steeping— Raw barley is alternately submerged and drained for 40-48 hours in steep tanks until a moisture level of 40% or greater is achieved. This activates the embryo to initiate enzyme development and growth of the rootlets. This is the beginning of germination.

2) Germination— Steeped grain is then moved to a germination compartment where germination continues for four to seven days at controlled temperature, humidity and oxygen levels. During germination the barley is modified. Modification refers to the breakdown of complex proteins and carbohydrates which opens up the starch reserves. Enzymes in germinating barley include high levels of alpha amylase, and lower levels of beta amylase and proteases.

3) Drying (kilning)—Drying on a kiln or roaster halts germination. Gentle kiln drying preserves enzymes and develops malty flavors. Higher temperature drying in a kiln and/or roaster results in more unique flavor development and decreases or completely denatures enzymes.

How do I use malted barley grains?

1. Top dress plants with 1/8 - 1/4 Cup per plant. 

2. Build your soil using this milled meal at 1/2 - 1 Cup Per Cubic Foot. 

3. Bubble a tea for 4 hours in water then use immediately using 1/8th cup per gallon water. 

Why should I use malted barley grains?

When used in your garden malted barley Grain functions as a source of growth hormone catalysts, providing enzymes and plant hormone producing microbes to feed the soil and supercharge your garden.